What Is The Place Of CPR When Aeds Fail?

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There are occasions when an individual who gets cardiac arrest will be subjected to the use of an automated external defibrillator (known as an AED), but which may not work owing to a number of reasons. This is what makes it important to know what to do when AEDs fail. Even before we outline the benefits of CPR in such a case, it is crucial to known what the AED is and exactly how it works. AED is a small computerized gadget that helps to show when the heart rate suddenly becomes irregular and erratic. This is vital for the simple reason that irregular heart rate is one of the symptoms that precede a cardiac arrest. By knowing when to act, there is a great likelihood that an individual will survive.

AEDs are typically found in a hospital setup as well as in different places where it is accessible by the public. So, what happens when AEDs fail? Research has shown that failure of the AEDs does not necessarily mean that the victim does not have any other source of help. When CPR (cardiac pulmonary resuscitation) is carried out well, it improves the chances of survival. One of the reasons this was made possible is because by providing chest compressions right away rather than studying the heart rhythms on the AED, the result was great circulation of blood within the body as well as the victim’s survival by anywhere between 10 and 12m months.

This is certainly a move in the right direction because despite occurrences when AEDs fail, the research also showed that individuals who get continual chest compressions tend to have better neurological results at the time of discharge. What’s more, such individuals are likely to have less brain damage compared to their counterparts who receive CPR with breaks midway. Even with the advancements that have been made in this regard, it is still sad to note that overall, the rate of survival of victims accorded help outside a hospital setup is still low.

In an effort to make general improvement, and not just that which is pertinent when AEDs fail, various organizations have come together and put up a number of recommendations. These recommendations help to ensure that a victim of cardiac arrest gets as much continual CPR as is possible. This can be achieved in the methods outlined below:

–          Getting rid of rhythm checks promptly following the cardiac arrest.

–          Raising the ratio of chest compressions. Initially, this ratio was pegged at 15:2, but was increased to 30:2 to improve the chances of survival AEDs fail.

–          Increasing the required time period for CPR in between evaluating the heart rhythm. This increase is best pegged at 100%, which is essentially doubling the time period.

–          Seeking to improve the frequency of bystander CPR occurrences as they make a huge difference as far as the rate of survival for out-of-the-hospital setting is concerned.

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