Basic First Aid for Summer

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First-Aid- SummerIt’s summer time and the living is easy. It’s also a time when little emergencies will arise whether you’re spending your summer at the beach, in your backyard or camping out in the woods. While most summer time emergencies are mild, it’s best to join some basic first aid training classes that can teach you how to handle those summer emergencies.

  • Bee Stings

Bee stings are one of the most common summer time emergencies that happen. When someone is stung by a bee, gently push the stinger out as quickly as possible with a blunt-edged object or your fingernail. Clean the stung area with soap and clean water, pat down with a cool compress and relieve the pain with a dab of calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream. But watch out for an allergic reaction like difficulty breathing or wheezing breaths. Bring the patient to an emergency room as soon as you can.

  • Poison Ivy

Prevention is always better than a cure in the case of poison ivy. Learning how to spot these pesky, shiny leaves is a great idea but something that’s not always feasible. In the event of a poison ivy encounter, apply a cool baking soda or oatmeal infused to rinse out poison ivy’s rash-inducing oil. Apply calamine lotion on the infected area and make sure that all the clothes, shoes and sheets that the person has been wearing or has touched has been washed thoroughly. Poison ivy’s oil can be very potent and can stick to clothes and other surfaces for as long as a month and can infect people again.  See a doctor immediately if swelling occurs or the rash is oozing.

  • Tick Bites

Ticks are the bane of the summer months. However, ticks can easily be removed by lightly gripping the tick with tweezers then pulling it off gently. Clean the area well and apply an antiseptic cream. Some ticks carry Lyme disease so you should keep close watch of the bitten area. Go immediately to your doctor if the bite mark expands or turns into a rash. Watch out for symptoms like aching joints, fever, chest pain, headaches, heart palpitations, light sensitivity and difficulty in breathing.

  • Swimmer’s Ear

Children who spend a lot of their time swimming are in danger of developing swimmer’s ear. This is usually caused by bacteria or fungus and results in the ear becoming red and itchy. The ear can experience pain when tugged or might have some liquid seeping out. Swimmer’s ear is often cured by using over-the-counter ear drops and by keeping the child away from the pool or the beach for several days. Consult a doctor if the pain doesn’t disappear within a day.

  • Jellyfish Stings

Swimming in the ocean is always a glorious experience, but there’s also the danger of encountering a jellyfish. First aid courses often teach that in the event of a jellyfish sting, the wound must be soaked first in vinegar water in order to remove the tentacles. Once all the jellyfish tentacles have been scraped off, the stung area is rinsed with salt water. It’s crucial that all the tentacles are removed as these can expand in fresh water and sting the person again. Get medical help immediately if the victim is stung on the face or around the genital region.

Lifeguards are required to have First Aid certification so in the event of an emergency while swimming in a pool or in the sea, look for these reliable professionals immediately.

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  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.