How to Treat Motion Sickness

Fact Checked

One of the common problems aroused by movement via the different

transportation facilities or other sources is motion sickness. It is more common for people to get motion sickness while in a car, airplane, train or boat (commonly called seasickness). Generally, it is characterized by feeling queasy that may lead to several symptoms.It is often said that seating location makes a difference in motion sickness. Risks for motion sickness actually decrease when one is more exposed to being in motion.

Motion Sickness Causes

                Conflicting signals to the brain from the eyes, inner ear muscles and joints of the body and inner ear cause motion sickness. A common example of this is while in a boat with no windows, the inner ear sends signal to the brain of the rolling motions which is not seen by the eye causing conflicting signals. The brain will them conclude that it is due to hallucination caused by ingestion of poison. The brain the sends signals to induce vomit,resulting to motion sickness. Symptoms may onset even just at the thought of movement.

Motion Sickness Types

                Motion sickness has three categories, motion sickness as a result of motion that is felt but not seen, motion sickness as a result of motion that is seen but not felt, and motion sickness as a result of detection of motion but do not correspond.

  • Motion sickness as a result of motion that is felt but not seen
    • Carsickness
    • Seasickness
    • Airsickness
    • Spinning resulting to dizziness
    • Motion sickness as a result of motion that is seen but not felt
      • Watching videos, especially 3D and IMAX
      • Stimulation sickness by playing videogames, virtual reality, among others
      • Motion sickness as a result of detection of motion but do not correspond
        • Coriolis effect

Motion Sickness Signs and Symptoms

                Although there are different types of motion sickness, the signs and symptoms that manifest are almost similar in all situations. These include:

  • Cold sweats
  • Feeling queasy
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pale, clammy skin
  • Fatigue

Motion Sickness Treatment

Motion Sickness                There are multiple ways to treat motion sickness. The best way to treat motion sickness is to stop the source of conflicting brain signals. If this is not possible, several remedies may be done. However, the tips mentioned below cannot be substituted for first aid training. These are mere hints to alleviate motion sickness.

  • Focus on the horizon or on a far away, immobile object.
  • Distract self by playing music or other things that do not require much movement.
  • Rest against a backseat and keep the head still.
  • Take antihistamines.
  • If possible, open any potential source of fresh air.

Motion Sickness Prevention

  • If riding a car, drive or sit in the passenger’s seat. If not possible, face the windshield and do not attempt to do other activities, such as reading.
  • If riding a ship, take a seat in the front, middle or upper deck of the ship, near the level of the water
  • If riding a place, request to be seated by the front edge of a wing.
  • If riding a train, sit in the front or by the window and face forward at all times.
  • If playing video games, take breaks in between games.
  • Avoid consumption of food and drinks, especially caffeinated and alcoholic beverages,

Medications may be taken beforehand to stop onset of motion sickness.

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